Community Action People: It’s All About Call and Response

By Jane Hirshberg
Campus and Community Engagement Manger
The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center has always been committed to creating programming that responds to voices in its surrounding community. In the past five years, however, that commitment has been exemplified by some extraordinary projects that have reached people who either never would have considered coming to the UMD campus, let alone The Clarice, or people who have not considered themselves arts lovers—until they were invited to experience creative expression that was full of relevance to their lives. To that end, The Clarice has created a group we call Community Action People, made up of people who are community leaders, arts advocates, artists, teachers, elected officials and many others. This group meets once every two months and focuses on a specific topic of interest to the group’s members. Each meeting happens at a different space, hosted by a different community-based organization, with key contributors participating to inform subject matter. But before we get too deep into what the group is now, let’s look at its history and how it has evolved to be a dynamic and influential force for not only the leadership of The Clarice, but for the entire UMD campus.

Poet Nikky Finney reading at At War With Ourselves event; Credit: The Clarice

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Images: Artstor

Artstor is an online repository of close to two million images in the arts, architecture, archeology and other areas.  It is freely available to members of the College Park and some other campuses in the system, and access can be arranged for faculty on other campuses.  Here is a sample of images in Artstor.

Temple of Apollo, Delphi, Greece

 

12th-16th century market place, Durham, England

Frank Gehry, Auditorium interior, Walt Disney Concert Hall, 2003

Fountain, Rebecca Belmore, Video installation at the Canadian Pavilion of the Venice Biennale, 2005

Male Shinto deity

Meridian Hill Park (Wash. D. C.), Horace Peaslee, 20th century

Les Demoiselles d’ Avignon, Pablo Picasso, 1907

The Recovery of the Bald Eagle: How the First EPA Administrator and a Forest Service Biologist Saved Our National Symbol

Two adults in “West Bay” in Gogebic County, Michigan.   Credit: Rachel Eberius, MS student of Bill Bowerman

Two adults in “West Bay” in Gogebic County, Michigan.
Credit: Rachel Eberius, MS student of Bill Bowerman

Bill Bowerman, Professor and Chair
Department of Environmental Science and Technology, UMCP

This is the story of how William Ruckelshaus, the First USEPA Administrator, and John Mathisen, the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Chippewa National Forest, working independently, were the two people most responsible for saving bald eagles.  One is known for banning a number of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from use in the environment, the other for developing a series of land management actions that protected the eagles’ nesting habitat. Continue reading

Images: Bill Wolff

Artist Statement

When my children are my age, many animals and environments that I grew up thinking were among the most unique and beautiful on the planet will very likely no longer exist.

These gestural, biomorphic abstractions poignantly reflect both beauty and this sense of possible loss. The “heads” have been replaced by an open cone, a form which has evolved from an open mouth and which I have used in my work over the last ten years to as a quiet comment on consumerism. These sculptures are carved, hollowed and assembled from sections of wood with metal leaf on the surface, a variation of the traditional yosegi zukuri process that I studied in Japan. All of this wood was found and otherwise destined to be firewood. Each work is initiated with a chainsaw, jointed with chisel and plane, charred with a torch, scraped and sanded, leafed with metal, brushed with chemicals and then scraped and drawn on. Tool marks from every stage are visible atop the grain of the wood and are a conversation. The surface of the work tells its history. This is the truest way for me to recognize the trees that provide both the material and grounding for my work.

Bill Wolff is on the faculty, and head of the sculpture area, in the Art Department at Salisbury State University. He holds an MFA from Louisiana State University and an MA from the Tokyo University of the Arts. His website is www.billwolff.net

Photos © Bill Wolff

Bellow, 2012, 36”x18”x24”. Cherry, copper leaf.

Bellow, 2012, 36”x18”x24”.
Cherry, copper leaf.

O Ye, 2009, 126”x60”x60”. Camphor, copper leaf. Installation view at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts.

O Ye, 2009, 126”x60”x60”.
Camphor, copper
leaf. Installation view at Tokyo National
University of Fine Arts.

Birdhouse, 2007, 78”x48”x48”. Ginko wood, copper plate. Installation view at Hirakushi Denchu Studio, Tokyo, Japan.

Birdhouse, 2007, 78”x48”x48”.
Ginko wood, copper plate.
Installation view at Hirakushi Denchu Studio
Tokyo, Japan.

Furrow and Eat the Young 2009, Furrow: 62”x120”x48”. Cherry, copper leaf. Eat the Young: 124”x40”x36”. Cherry, copper leaf. Installation view at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts.

Furrow and Eat the Young 2009,
Furrow: 62”x120”x48”. Cherry, copper leaf.
Eat the Young: 124”x40”x36”. Cherry, copper leaf.
Installation view at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts.

Dance, 2015, 18”x14”x12”. Cast iron on padauk base.

Dance, 2015, 18”x14”x12”.
Cast iron on padauk base.

Organ, 2011, 72”x120”x48”. Oak, Japanese maple, copper plate, copper leaf.

Organ, 2011, 72”x120”x48”.
Oak, Japanese maple, copper plate, copper leaf.

Flock, 2012. 30 Elements, each approximately 36”x24”x24”. Installation view of detail at Gallery CoExist, Tokyo, Japan.

Flock, 2012. 30
Elements, each approximately 36”x24”x24”.
Installation view of detail at Gallery CoExist, Tokyo, Japan.

Charge, 2014, 66”x40”x20”. Maple, aluminum leaf, graphite on steel base.

Charge, 2014, 66”x40”x20”.
Maple, aluminum leaf, graphite on steel base.

A Conversation: Art, Art History, the Phillips…

Last October, the University of Maryland and the Phillips Collection announced a formal partnership.  The Faculty Voice invited Meredith Gill, the Chair of the Department of Art History and Archaeology, and  W.C. “Chip” Richardson, the Chair of the Department of Art, to discuss the implications of the affiliation for their departments, and the broader role of the arts at the University.  The conversation was recorded and has been edited for length and clarity.

FV What does the affiliation with the Phillips Collection mean to your departments?  What effect does it have?

MG Well, I think the first thing to say is that this is not simply a partnership that will have ramifications and very positive impact on the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Department of Art but also on the campus more broadly. Continue reading

Images: Art and Art History at College Park

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Panel discussion—Comic Books and Graphic Novels as Literary and Visual Forms

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Panel discussion—Comic Books and Graphic Novels as Literary and Visual Forms

2105 Faculty Exhibition, University of Maryland Gallery

2015 Faculty Exhibition, University of Maryland Gallery

Professor John Ruppert. “Three Orbs.” Aluminum chain-link and stainless steel. 12’ by 16’ diameter, 2006. Installed at The Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia.

Professor John Ruppert. “Three Orbs.” Aluminum chain-link and stainless steel. 12’ by 16’ diameter, 2006. Installed at The Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Brandon Morse, Patrick Craig (sculpture), Matt McLaughlin, W.C. Richardson.

2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Brandon Morse, Patrick Craig (sculpture), Matt McLaughlin, W.C. Richardson.

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Professor Meredith Gill leads students through the Sistine Chapel.

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Professor Meredith Gill leads students through the Sistine Chapel.

Works from 2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Hasan Elahi, Justin Strom, Emily Conover, Patrick Craig.

Works from 2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Hasan Elahi, Justin Strom, Emily Conover, Patrick Craig.

The Art of Jamison Odone

About the Artist

Professor Odone, an Assistant Professor of Illustration at Frostburg State, is an author and illustrator of Children’s Books and Graphic novels as well as an exhibiting artist. He received his BFA in 2002 from The Art Institute of Boston in Illustration and his MFA in 2012 from Western Connecticut State University, also in Illustration. With his debut book, Honey Badgers in 2007, Publishers Weekly said, “Odone, tapping into a powerful vein of fantasy, has created the kind of book certain children will cling to, years after they abandon the rest of their picture book collections.” Since then there have been a string of releases which include The Bedtime Train, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Mole Had Everything, Annabel Lee; and in 2014 he published two graphic novels, Lies In The Dust: A Tale Of Remorse From The Salem Witch Trials and Accused: The Fairfield Witch Trials.

In 2009 Jamison was selected as a recipient of the Connecticut State Fellowship Grant Award for his body of work. In 2011 he was offered a professorship to head the Illustration Focus in the BFA program at Frostburg State University in Maryland. In 2013 he had a solo exhibition of his work from the book Mole Had Everything displayed at the Mercurial Gallery in Danbury, CT. In 2014 an exhibition of the work from Lies In The Dust at Salem State University in Salem, MA, and the work from Accused was exhibited at The Fairfield Museum. In 2015 there will be a retrospective exhibition of his career in illustration and books shown at St. John’s University in New York. Also in 2015, Odone co-founded the independent publishing collective, Box Books* with fellow author/illustrator Tomithy Decker.

Publications for 2015 will include the illustrated books, Poor Joseph and An Aria For The Plains, and a reissue of his Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the book.

*www.theboxbooks.com, http://www.facebook.com/theboxbooks

Page from Mole Had Everything, 2013 Blue Apple Books (written and illustrated)

Page from Mole Had Everything, 2013 Blue Apple Books (written and illustrated)

Page from Annabel Lee by Poe, 2014 Box Books (illustrated)

Page from Annabel Lee by Poe, 2014 Box Books (illustrated)

Page from Poor Joseph, 2015 Box Books (written and Illustrated)

Page from Poor Joseph, 2015 Box Books (written and Illustrated)

Page from Honey Badgers, 2007 Front Street Books (written and illustrated)

Page from Honey Badgers, 2007 Front Street Books (written and illustrated)